Your turn, Mr Speirs

April 2019

Thank you to the Westside Weekly Messenger for its “Protect Our Dolphins” campaign, and to the thousands of South Australians who supported it.

It is very sad that so many dolphins have been killed while our politicians have taken so long to bring in speed laws, but nevertheless, thanks also to Minister Stephan Knoll.

I am still very concerned that the speed limits have not been extended over the whole dolphin sanctuary, and fear more injuries and deaths. If another dolphin is struck by a boat, then we must resume the campaign to further reduce speeds in that area, so boaties need to be put on notice to be careful.

Now that Minister Knoll has done something for our dolphins, it is time for Minister David Speirs to do something for our native ducks and ban duck hunting, and before next year. Right now, there are injured ducks slowly dying in agony in our wetlands from shotgun pellets. I wonder if Minister Speirs cares.

Christine Pierson,   President, Cats Assistance To Sterilise

Dolphin Limits

March 2019

Transport Minister Stephan Knoll is taking an extraordinarily long time to reduce the speed limit in the Port River, despite the fact that industries have no objection, and boaties have other options for speeding other than in a dolphin sanctuary. 
Yesterday’s announcement of a $5 million fishing hub at Cruikshank’s Corner on the Port River makes the seven knot limit seem less likely. 
The deaths of two more dolphin calves has resulted in the demise of almost every newborn calf in the past two years. 
This is heartbreaking for people who care about these unique marine mammals who feel their loss as we do. We are lucky to have them on our doorstep and they must be protected. 
Fay Mathews

Too much loss

March 2019

Chuckling over the cartoon of Minister Stephan Knoll I can see plenty of things that he needs to be concerned about, but I am glad that the most important issue is not in the cartoon, because there is nothing funny about it – only sadness.

That, of course, is the death of yet another little baby dolphin.

I hope that the deaths of all of these kind and gentle creatures is weighing heavily upon Mr Knoll. How much longer is he going to take to get this legislation passed to stop this senseless killing and injury?

This sanctuary is for the dolphins, and the whole area needs to be made safe, with no speeding boats. In fact, why are having speeding boats in this sanctuary at all?

There are plenty of other places for speedboats besides the dolphin sanctuary, so please, boaters, put the lives of these animals above your selfish entertainment.

 Christine Pierson

Save the dolphins

March 2019

The tragic mother dolphin Ripple has just lost another newborn calf. Dr Mike Bossley has brought their plight for survival in the polluted Port River to our attention for many years, and has seen them granted a sanctuary.

Sadly, the sanctuary has proved to be in name only as, year after year, they are killed by boat strike, caused by unrestricted speeding.

The commercial interests in the river are no impediment to a speed limit, yet Transport Minister Stephan Knoll has still not acted on the proposed 7-knot speed limit in parts of the sanctuary, to slow recreational boating. Dr Bossley knows that the dolphins will never be safe until the speed limit is applied more widely throughout the entire Barker Inlet and river.

Dolphins can’t read signs, they don’t understand boundaries, and they need immediate respect and protection from the only people who can help: our politicians.

Diane Cornelius

Get the job done

February 2019

How much longer do we have to wait for Stephan Knoll to get this speed limit finalised (Tears - and joy - for dolphins, Messenger Community News, February 6)?

What kind of people do we have in our parliament that they can let these little calves continually die, knowing that their mothers are grieving from the loss of their babies, while these politicians fiddle around with getting the essential legislation passed to get the speed limits installed?

In addition, it is not good enough to still have areas where these dolphins are living, as open speed limits.

Surely these speed boats can be stopped; it just takes a minister who can stand up for these much-maligned creatures, instead of the usual weak approach, when it comes to protecting animals. What about it, Stephan Knoll? Stop risking the dolphins’ lives and get the job done.

Christine Pierson, President, Cats Assistance To Sterilise

Recipe for disaster

January 2019

I don't know, humans: aren’t you supposed to be the clever ones on the planet?

Surely you can solve a little mystery of what’s killing your beloved dolphins?

Oh, wait: you have almost certainly solved it. You just haven’t done anything about it yet.

Do you even deserve to have something as precious as dolphins living and breeding in your city if you won’t protect them better than this? Maybe not.

Can’t you be the clever ones that you’re cracked up to be, and insist on action to save something so beautiful and so precious? Robert Eastman was almost certainly right: the simple fact is that all speedboats and jet skis must be banned from the Port River.

The dolphins will finally have their sanctuary – a safe place simply for them.

Speedboats and dolphins are a recipe for disaster and heartache.

Helen Dowland

Stand up for dolphins

January 2019

I AM in total agreement with the letter from Diane Cornelius (Messenger Community News, December 12) regarding the half-hearted lack of commitment to ensure the safety of the dolphins in the Port River dolphin sanctuary.

The protection of the dolphins should be the first priority of the sanctuary, and that means lowering the speed limit in all areas.

Our Environment Minister needs to take a stronger stance on this issue, and speak up on behalf of the thousands who want the dolphins protected.

Janine Clipstone

Justice for captives 

December 2018

I totally agree with Jenny Moxham that Andrew Bolt would not want to spend his days in a concrete cell.

Yet he criticised activists from “Justice for Captives,” who held signs at Sea World, that read “Dolphins belong in the ocean.” Dolphins live in herds and communicate as their own nations around the world and can live naturally in the wild for 50 years.

Whether they are captured or captive bred they still have their natural instincts, yet are forced to “exist” for decades in concrete bathtubs.

Fortunately, we have David Attenborough’s amazing documentaries and do not have to watch them perform unnatural tricks for human entertainment.

bottlenose-dolphin at 25%.jpg

This teaches children nothing about care and respect for these magnificent mammals.

The only way to prevent this travesty is to not monetarily support them.

Diane Cornelius

Dolphins do not belong in captivity

December 2018

Andrew Bolt in his article “Don’t give in to the bullies”  accused the activists from Justice for Captives – who held signs at Sea World that read “Dolphins belong in the ocean” – of bullying.

In our fortunate, educated society we all know freedom is imperative for intelligent dolphins who live in herds and communicate as their own nations around the world and can live naturally in the wild for 50 years.

Whether they are captured or captive-bred, they still have their natural instincts, yet are forced to “exist” for decades in concrete bathtubs.

Fortunately, we have David Attenborough’s amazing documentaries and do not have to watch them perform unnatural tricks for our entertainment.

This teaches children nothing about care and respect for these magnificent mammals.

The only way to prevent this unnecessary cruelty is to not to monetarily support them.

Diane Cornelius

Protect habitat 

December 2018
Reading “Dolphin virus breakthrough” we, as a human species, would do far better reversing climate change and protecting the environment than spending billions of dollars on trying to create vaccines to combat our pollution and decimation of the planet. 
An example to illustrate this is the Port River dolphin sanctuary , where we are still allowing the killing and injuring of these vulnerable creatures, and the pollution of the waterways. 
Almost all vaccines and their development involve the torture of animals and cruel experimentation, hidden behind closed doors. 
Christine Pearson

Dolphins do not belong in captivity

December 2018

Andrew Bolt in his article “Don’t give in to the bullies”  accused the activists from Justice for Captives – who held signs at Sea World that read “Dolphins belong in the ocean” – of bullying.

In our fortunate, educated society we all know freedom is imperative for intelligent dolphins who live in herds and communicate as their own nations around the world and can live naturally in the wild for 50 years.

Whether they are captured or captive-bred, they still have their natural instincts, yet are forced to “exist” for decades in concrete bathtubs.

Fortunately, we have David Attenborough’s amazing documentaries and do not have to watch them perform unnatural tricks for our entertainment.

This teaches children nothing about care and respect for these magnificent mammals.

The only way to prevent this unnecessary cruelty is to not to monetarily support them.

Diane Cornelius

You wouldn’t like it, would you Andrew?

December 2018

Andrew Bolt doesn’t believe keeping whales and dolphins imprisoned for their entire lives in small concrete tanks is cruel.  

I bet if he was condemned to life imprisonment in a small concrete cell he’d quickly change his mind.

Jenny Moxham

Recipe for disaster

December 2018   

I don't know, humans: aren’t you supposed to be the clever ones on the planet?

Surely you can solve a little mystery of what’s killing your beloved dolphins?

Oh, wait: you have almost certainly solved it. You just haven’t done anything about it yet.

Do you even deserve to have something as precious as dolphins living and breeding in your city if you won’t protect them better than this? Maybe not.

Can’t you be the clever ones that you’re cracked up to be, and insist on action to save something so beautiful and so precious? Robert Eastman was almost certainly right: the simple fact is that all speedboats and jet skis must be banned from the Port River.

The dolphins will finally have their sanctuary – a safe place simply for them.

Speedboats and dolphins are a recipe for disaster and heartache.

Helen Dowland

Protect Dolphins

December 2018

I am in total agreement with the letter from Diane Cornelius regarding the half-hearted lack of commitment to ensure the safety of the dolphins in the Port River dolphin sanctuary.

The protection of the dolphins should be the sanctuary’s first priority, and that means lowering the speed limit in all areas. Our Environment Minister needs to take a stronger stance, and speak up on behalf of the thousands who want the dolphins protected.

 Janine Clipstone

A joy for dolphins

December 2018

The article “Leaping to victory” was a joy to behold.

How encouraging to have Transport Minister Stephan Knoll reveal that he is planning to introduce the speed limit to a vast area of currently unlimited speed zones within the Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary.

Full marks to Dr Mike Bossley for his tireless efforts to help these wonderful creatures, “Protect Our Dolphins” campaign, and the more than 20,000 people who signed the petition calling for the lower speed limit.

I agree with conservationist Marianna Boorman that any areas without a speed limit would still be of considerable concern, and ask Minister Knoll to also include these in the changes.

There is no acceptable argument to not set the 7-knot limit for the entire dolphin sanctuary.

Anyone who considers that their own personal entertainment and lifestyle is more important than the lives and suffering of our dolphins, living in their own water homes, is selfish.

Humans are the invaders.

Let us keep all the dolphins safe from speeding boats. There are plenty of other places for hoon boaties, without endangering these animals’ precious lives.

Christine Peirson

President, Cats Assistance To Sterilise

Dolphins moving

October 2018
It was heartening to read that at last there has been some discussion and negotiation on the issue of protecting the Port River dolphins from injury and death from speeding craft. 
The Minister, Mr Stephan Knoll, is to make his decision known very soon. 
Let’s trust that he makes a wise decision taking into account that it is a matter of life and death for the dolphins. 
Limiting the speed of boats to 10-knots in certain areas of the river in no way prevents others using the waterway. 
It will, however, be a huge statement reflecting Mr. Knoll’s attitude towards the importance of conserving our natural environment and its wildlife. 

Rose Kerr
 

Win for dolphins

October 2018

I was delighted to see that Hollywood actress Teresa Palmer has backed this paper and nearly 20,000 people who have signed its campaign’s petition  

I certainly agree with Ms Palmer when she states: “I can’t understand why the government isn’t doing everything it can to protect these beautiful creatures.”

Let us hope that Dr Bossley’s optimism that the government would “finally take action to protect the dolphins” will be made law.

It saddens me that so many dolphins and their calves have suffered so much heartache, pain and death for so long, simply because the authorities involved have turned their backs on these defenceless creatures.

How many more animals are going to die and be injured while Minister Stephan Knoll takes his time addressing this urgent and deadly issue?

Christine Pierson, President, Cats Assistance To Sterilise

Shameful tragedy

September 2018

Responding to “Oriana sparks rallying cry” Oriana’s life has been a tragedy for which we, as a human species, should hang our heads in shame.

This gentle and loving Port River dolphin’s life has been a living hell, with one terrible disaster after another.

Her mother, Bianca, was almost certainly killed by a speeding boat, and for this Oriana grieved, as any family member would.

Her baby, CK, also died, and Oriana pushed along her little dead one for a week.

Now Oriana has been so badly injured from another speeding boat that her wounds have caused a slow and agonising death in the polluted waters of the so-called “dolphin sanctuary” area.

All of this suffering and death could have been prevented if the authorities responsible had stopped the selfish boat drivers from their destructive and lethal behaviour.

Still, nothing is being done. How much longer is this cruelty going to continue before the authorities take action?

Christine Pierson

Fight for dolphins

September 2018

The Port River dolphins are losing their battle to live and breed in Adelaide. This needs action. They are dearly loved by many who want to see that action – probably a speed limit on boats from unlimited to 10 knots.

Everyone knows that it’s almost a miracle to have a pod of breeding dolphins within a city area, but the problem is that they’re being killed by speeding boats. Jenni Wyrsta, who found the wounded mother of a baby killed recently, nutshelled it: “This population is not growing – we are losing babies.”

That’s the way to the end. That’s why it’s so rare to have this within a city. A lot of people care about these dolphins. They’re dearly loved and hotly defended.

Justifiable endless dithering can stall anything. In the Port River, it’s increasing signage, reinstating speed markers and appointing more authorised officers – but dolphins are still dying. It needs a decision and action.

Dr Bossley suggests lowering the maximum speed limit; that’s likely the decision that we need.

Now we need the action.

 Helen Dowland

Unique attraction

September 2018
I  just can’t understand why Transport Minister Stephan Knoll does not limit the speed of boats in the Port River. 
It is so lacking in common sense and compassion to ignore the advice of dolphin expert Dr Mike Bossley and the wishes of most people. 
And these dolphins are unique, a tourist attraction. 

Alice Shore

Listen to us, Minister

August 2018

Twelve thousand people signed a petition to stop speeding boats from killing dolphin babies in the Port River dolphin sanctuary.

Why won’t Transport Minister Stephan Knoll at least listen and make an informed decision about the capped, blanket 10-knot speed limit, which dolphin expert Mike Bossley believes will at least give the dolphins a fighting chance to survive?

Three calves were suspected of being killed by boaties. Distressed dolphin mothers have been seen carrying their dead babies around for days. The river is badly polluted, which leads to dolphin health issues.

We are lucky to have these unique marine mammals in an inner suburb, and should give them the respect and protection that they deserve.

At the moment, it is a sanctuary in name only.

Diane Cornelius

Correct your aim

June 2018

IN response to the petition which asked the State Government to lower speeds in the Port River in order to protect the dolphins there, Transport Minister Stephen Knoll says that he believes that “the current speed limit regime works.”

Yes, it works very well, if your aim is to kill off the dolphin babies.

 Rosemary Kerr

Get on-board with Susan Close

June 2018

It is so good to read that Susan Close is campaigning for a 118km protected zone encompassing Garden Island, Barker Inlet, Outer Harbour, North Haven and north to Port Gawler where speedboats and jetskis would be restricted to a blanket 10-knot speed limit.

The existing dangerous unlimited speed limit is endangering life and limb of everyone.

The huge groundswell of public opinion (11,500 signatures) supports this response.

The Port Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary is one of the few places in the world that has a resident dolphin population living in proximity to an urban centre. These majestic creatures have lived since the 1980s in danger of death from pollution from dredging and dumping, and speeding hoons who should know better.

I am hoping that Environment and Water Minister David Speirs will agree with Mike Bossley that the dolphins’ protection is of paramount importance.

Diane Cornelius

Heartbreaking loss of Dolphins

June 2018

I have been following the dolphin stories in Messenger Community news for many weeks, and cannot believe that this cruelty of speeding boats continues when it is a known fact that the speeding boats are killing and injuring the dolphins in what is supposed to be a sanctuary.

The Port River dolphin sanctuary resident Oriana is one dolphin mother who has gone through the trauma of birth and loss of two of her newborn calves. This time she heartbreakingly carried her dead baby for a week, before it was taken from her.

Other female dolphins assist at births, babysit the calves and help with their rearing. Babies suckle every 30 minutes after birth, and continue to drink from their mothers for 12 months. They are a metre long at birth and stay close to their caring mothers for 18 months.

Needlessly, newborns were killed this year because boaties put their thrills before caring for our unique, intelligent dolphins.

Christine Pierson. President, Cats Assistance To Sterilise

Susan Close is campaigning for a 118km protected zone

June 2018

It is so good to read that Susan Close is campaigning for a 118km protected zone, encompassing Garden Island, Barker Inlet, Outer Harbour, North Haven and north to Pt Gawler where speedboats and jet skis will be restricted to a blanket 10knot speed limit.

The huge groundswell of public opinion, 11,500 signatures, support this response. The Port Adelaide Dolphin Sanctuary is one of the few places in the world that has a resident dolphin population living in close proximity to an urban centre. These majestic creatures have lived since the 80's in danger of death from pollution and speeding

Diane Cornelius

Fight for dolphins

June 2018

Messenger Community News is to be commended for keeping the plight of the Port River dolphins in the forefront of people’s minds.

How good to hear that SA’s Environment Minister, David Speirs, is meeting with Dr Mike Bossly, who has had 30 years’ experience with the dolphins, to discuss their welfare, the pollution and speedboat hazards that they have faced for years.

Transport Minister Stephan Knoll has signed off on the environmentally catastrophic dredging of the river. He is unmoved by an 11,000-strong petition by concerned people, that is about making a well-signposted safe speed limit, rather than the present dangerous “four knots to unlimited”.

Dolphins do not know the boundaries of the sanctuary, so are extremely vulnerable. A question for Mr Speirs needs to be: “How much more will the dredging of the river for shipping affect our beautiful wildlife?” Why repeat past mistakes?

 Diane Cornelius

Correct your aim

May 2018

IN responce to the petition which asked the State Government to lower speeds in the Port River in order to protect the dolphins there, Transport Minister Stephen Knoll says that he believes that “the current speed limit regime works.”

Yes, it works very well, if your aim is to kill off the dolphin babies.

 Rosemary Kerr

Treasure our gift

May 2018

Here in the port, we have a rare gift of nature. Sadly this gift is so poorly appreciated by so many people.

I refer to the beautiful, clever, resilient creatures- the Dolphins of the Port River. How good it is to have dolphins living alongside us in suburbia. How much better it would be if we could be assured that they were being cherished and protected.

We are not acting as their custodians but rather as their mortal enemy. When we are not fouling their habitat with industrial waste ( more than twenty years worth) and polluting their water with our rubbish, we are maiming, mutilating and killing them in hit-and-run collisions.

Government bodies both local and state need to act now to ensure an authentic dolphin sanctuary: not a hit-and-miss affair but a genuinely safe haven free from pollution, poisons, danger and cruel abuse.

Rose Kerr

Port River Dolphins deserve protection

May 2018

The article "Port River Dolphins deserve protection," the river's majestic animals are fighting for survival. SA has the only wild dolphin pod living within our city limits.

A joyful baby boom has ended in tragedy, as three of the seven newborns have been killed. Boat strike and the shocking pollution of the river have been discussed for years without resolution. Mothers care for their young for six years, and grieve, carrying them for weeks when they are killed. 

Dolphins don't know where the limits of their 118 sq.km sanctuary boundaries are, so river users must take responsibility to ensure the safety of these unique creatures.The sanctuary includes Garden Island, Barker Outlet, North Haven and Outer Harbour. Clearly the 4knot (7Kmh) speed limit must be upheld. The pollution cleaned up, and polluters and speeding offenders prosecuted.

To allow dolphins to healthily thrive in their river home. People are asked not to feed them, and to call 82739100 is they see any dolphins injured. 

Diane Cornelius